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The latest News on the Environment. Articles for residents and businesses of Australia from National and International resources.

 
 

Blue Planet 2: Attenborough defends shots filmed in studio - The Guardian

4229273 blue-planet-2-attenborough-defends-shots-filmed-in-studio-the-guardian

The fangtooth has the largest teeth relative to body size of any fish in the ocean. Blue Planet filmed the fangtooth in a special chamber aboard a ship. Photograph: Espen Rekdal/BBC

Footage of captive wildlife inserted into the BBC’s Blue Planet 2 series remains “totally true to nature”, according to the makers of the flagship show that reveals new insights into life in the oceans.

An octopus that armours itself with shells and rocks, fish that use sign language and tools and dazzling cuttlefish that appear to hypnotise their prey are among the new spectacles uncovered by the series, which starts later this week.

But, while the vast majority of the filming was done in the wild, some crucial behaviour could only be captured on film in controlled or laboratory conditions.

The BBC faced controversy in 2011 when a Frozen Planet programme, also narrated by Sir David Attenborough,...


Read full article...


4229277 blue-planet-2-attenborough-defends-shots-filmed-in-studio-the-guardian

The fangtooth has the largest teeth relative to body size of any fish in the ocean. Blue Planet filmed the fangtooth in a special chamber aboard a ship. Photograph: Espen Rekdal/BBC

Footage of captive wildlife inserted into the BBC’s Blue Planet 2 series remains “totally true to nature”, according to the makers of the flagship show that reveals new insights into life in the oceans.

An octopus that armours itself with shells and rocks, fish that use sign language and tools and dazzling cuttlefish that appear to hypnotise their prey are among the new spectacles uncovered by the series, which starts later this week.

But, while the vast majority of the filming was done in the wild, some crucial behaviour could only be captured on film in controlled or laboratory conditions.

The BBC faced controversy in 2011 when a Frozen Planet programme, also narrated by Sir David Attenborough,...


Read full article...


Read more: Blue Planet 2: Attenborough defends shots filmed in studio - The Guardian

Blue Planet 2: Attenborough defends shots filmed in studio - The Guardian

4229277 blue-planet-2-attenborough-defends-shots-filmed-in-studio-the-guardian

The fangtooth has the largest teeth relative to body size of any fish in the ocean. Blue Planet filmed the fangtooth in a special chamber aboard a ship. Photograph: Espen Rekdal/BBC

Footage of captive wildlife inserted into the BBC’s Blue Planet 2 series remains “totally true to nature”, according to the makers of the flagship show that reveals new insights into life in the oceans.

An octopus that armours itself with shells and rocks, fish that use sign language and tools and dazzling cuttlefish that appear to hypnotise their prey are among the new spectacles uncovered by the series, which starts later this week.

But, while the vast majority of the filming was done in the wild, some crucial behaviour could only be captured on film in controlled or laboratory conditions.

The BBC faced controversy in 2011 when a Frozen Planet programme, also narrated by Sir David Attenborough,...


Read full article...


Read more: Blue Planet 2: Attenborough defends shots filmed in studio - The Guardian

All invited to environment centre's AGM - The West Australian

4229279 all-invited-to-environment-centre-s-agm-the-west-australian
BDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough TimesBDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough Times

Environmentally-minded locals are invited to the Busselton-Dunsborough Environment Centre’s annual general meeting on Tuesday as the organisation looks to continue its 25 year legacy in the region.

Acting convenor Alison Cassanet said the organisation was entirely volunteer-run and survived solely on memberships, donations and the occasional grant.

“Like so many voluntary organisations, we’re trying to manage an increasing workload with only a small committee and would dearly love to have some more committed, environmentally-minded locals willing to become actively involved,” she said.

Ms Cassanet said locals with an enthusiasm for wildlife, coastal care, climate change, renewable energy or other environment fields would benefit from...


Read full article...


Read more: All invited to environment centre's AGM - The West Australian

All invited to environment centre's AGM - The West Australian

4229281 all-invited-to-environment-centre-s-agm-the-west-australian
BDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough TimesBDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough Times

Environmentally-minded locals are invited to the Busselton-Dunsborough Environment Centre’s annual general meeting on Tuesday as the organisation looks to continue its 25 year legacy in the region.

Acting convenor Alison Cassanet said the organisation was entirely volunteer-run and survived solely on memberships, donations and the occasional grant.

“Like so many voluntary organisations, we’re trying to manage an increasing workload with only a small committee and would dearly love to have some more committed, environmentally-minded locals willing to become actively involved,” she said.

Ms Cassanet said locals with an enthusiasm for wildlife, coastal care, climate change, renewable energy or other environment fields would benefit from...


Read full article...


4229293 all-invited-to-environment-centre-s-agm-the-west-australian
BDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough TimesBDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough Times

Environmentally-minded locals are invited to the Busselton-Dunsborough Environment Centre’s annual general meeting on Tuesday as the organisation looks to continue its 25 year legacy in the region.

Acting convenor Alison Cassanet said the organisation was entirely volunteer-run and survived solely on memberships, donations and the occasional grant.

“Like so many voluntary organisations, we’re trying to manage an increasing workload with only a small committee and would dearly love to have some more committed, environmentally-minded locals willing to become actively involved,” she said.

Ms Cassanet said locals with an enthusiasm for wildlife, coastal care, climate change, renewable energy or other environment fields would benefit from...


Read full article...


4229291 all-invited-to-environment-centre-s-agm-the-west-australian
BDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough TimesBDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough Times

Environmentally-minded locals are invited to the Busselton-Dunsborough Environment Centre’s annual general meeting on Tuesday as the organisation looks to continue its 25 year legacy in the region.

Acting convenor Alison Cassanet said the organisation was entirely volunteer-run and survived solely on memberships, donations and the occasional grant.

“Like so many voluntary organisations, we’re trying to manage an increasing workload with only a small committee and would dearly love to have some more committed, environmentally-minded locals willing to become actively involved,” she said.

Ms Cassanet said locals with an enthusiasm for wildlife, coastal care, climate change, renewable energy or other environment fields would benefit from...


Read full article...


4229279 all-invited-to-environment-centre-s-agm-the-west-australian
BDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough TimesBDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough Times

Environmentally-minded locals are invited to the Busselton-Dunsborough Environment Centre’s annual general meeting on Tuesday as the organisation looks to continue its 25 year legacy in the region.

Acting convenor Alison Cassanet said the organisation was entirely volunteer-run and survived solely on memberships, donations and the occasional grant.

“Like so many voluntary organisations, we’re trying to manage an increasing workload with only a small committee and would dearly love to have some more committed, environmentally-minded locals willing to become actively involved,” she said.

Ms Cassanet said locals with an enthusiasm for wildlife, coastal care, climate change, renewable energy or other environment fields would benefit from...


Read full article...


Read more: All invited to environment centre's AGM - The West Australian

Win for environment » Wangaratta Chronicle - Wangaratta Chronicle

4229283 win-for-environment-wangaratta-chronicle-wangaratta-chronicle

SINGLE-USE plastic bags will be banned across Victoria as part of $30.4 million in the 2017/18 State Budget to improve the ways we manage waste and recover resources.

And Wangaratta residents can have their say on what reusable alternatives to plastic bags they want to see locally such as ‘boomerang bags’.

This is because experiences in other places show that banning lightweight plastics can lead to undesirable results.

This includes increased use of heavier duty plastics, which can have an even greater environmental impact.

Wangaratta council’s OurSay survey is asking people to give their opinions on how lightweight plastic bags can be replaced by a more environmentally friendly alternative.

It supersedes a survey asking if plastic bags should be banned, one that attracted 1500 views but only 17 votes.

To continue reading this story, click here to access our digital edition

Share...


Read full article...


Read more: Win for environment » Wangaratta Chronicle - Wangaratta Chronicle

Win for environment » Wangaratta Chronicle - Wangaratta Chronicle

4229285 win-for-environment-wangaratta-chronicle-wangaratta-chronicle

SINGLE-USE plastic bags will be banned across Victoria as part of $30.4 million in the 2017/18 State Budget to improve the ways we manage waste and recover resources.

And Wangaratta residents can have their say on what reusable alternatives to plastic bags they want to see locally such as ‘boomerang bags’.

This is because experiences in other places show that banning lightweight plastics can lead to undesirable results.

This includes increased use of heavier duty plastics, which can have an even greater environmental impact.

Wangaratta council’s OurSay survey is asking people to give their opinions on how lightweight plastic bags can be replaced by a more environmentally friendly alternative.

It supersedes a survey asking if plastic bags should be banned, one that attracted 1500 views but only 17 votes.

To continue reading this story, click here to access our digital edition

Share...


Read full article...


4229283 win-for-environment-wangaratta-chronicle-wangaratta-chronicle

SINGLE-USE plastic bags will be banned across Victoria as part of $30.4 million in the 2017/18 State Budget to improve the ways we manage waste and recover resources.

And Wangaratta residents can have their say on what reusable alternatives to plastic bags they want to see locally such as ‘boomerang bags’.

This is because experiences in other places show that banning lightweight plastics can lead to undesirable results.

This includes increased use of heavier duty plastics, which can have an even greater environmental impact.

Wangaratta council’s OurSay survey is asking people to give their opinions on how lightweight plastic bags can be replaced by a more environmentally friendly alternative.

It supersedes a survey asking if plastic bags should be banned, one that attracted 1500 views but only 17 votes.

To continue reading this story, click here to access our digital edition

Share...


Read full article...


Read more: Win for environment » Wangaratta Chronicle - Wangaratta Chronicle

World Pollutionwatch: evidence grows of lifelong harm from polluted air - The Guardian

4229287 world-pollutionwatch-evidence-grows-of-lifelong-harm-from-polluted-air-the-guardian

Pigeons in Milan have displayed the effects of breathing exhaust from leaded petrol, and new analysis shows they are still suffering ill-effects. Photograph: Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images

There is growing evidence about the lifelong harm from air pollution. The air that we breathe as children can stunt our lung growth, potentially causing problems later in adult life. Air pollution breathed decades ago has been shown to shorten lives in the UK today. However, investigating these lifelong impacts is hampered by a lack of historic measurements.

Can the natural environment help us? Starting with lichens in the Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris in 1886, biomonitoring has helped to track air pollution. In a new twist, researchers in the US have constructed a 135-year history of pollution in America’s rust belt by studying soot in the feathers of museum bird specimens. Tests on 1,347...


Read full article...


Read more: World Pollutionwatch: evidence grows of lifelong harm from polluted air - The Guardian

World Pollutionwatch: evidence grows of lifelong harm from polluted air - The Guardian

4229289 world-pollutionwatch-evidence-grows-of-lifelong-harm-from-polluted-air-the-guardian

Pigeons in Milan have displayed the effects of breathing exhaust from leaded petrol, and new analysis shows they are still suffering ill-effects. Photograph: Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images

There is growing evidence about the lifelong harm from air pollution. The air that we breathe as children can stunt our lung growth, potentially causing problems later in adult life. Air pollution breathed decades ago has been shown to shorten lives in the UK today. However, investigating these lifelong impacts is hampered by a lack of historic measurements.

Can the natural environment help us? Starting with lichens in the Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris in 1886, biomonitoring has helped to track air pollution. In a new twist, researchers in the US have constructed a 135-year history of pollution in America’s rust belt by studying soot in the feathers of museum bird specimens. Tests on 1,347...


Read full article...


4229287 world-pollutionwatch-evidence-grows-of-lifelong-harm-from-polluted-air-the-guardian

Pigeons in Milan have displayed the effects of breathing exhaust from leaded petrol, and new analysis shows they are still suffering ill-effects. Photograph: Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images

There is growing evidence about the lifelong harm from air pollution. The air that we breathe as children can stunt our lung growth, potentially causing problems later in adult life. Air pollution breathed decades ago has been shown to shorten lives in the UK today. However, investigating these lifelong impacts is hampered by a lack of historic measurements.

Can the natural environment help us? Starting with lichens in the Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris in 1886, biomonitoring has helped to track air pollution. In a new twist, researchers in the US have constructed a 135-year history of pollution in America’s rust belt by studying soot in the feathers of museum bird specimens. Tests on 1,347...


Read full article...


Read more: World Pollutionwatch: evidence grows of lifelong harm from polluted air - The Guardian

All invited to environment centre's AGM - The West Australian

4229293 all-invited-to-environment-centre-s-agm-the-west-australian
BDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough TimesBDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough Times

Environmentally-minded locals are invited to the Busselton-Dunsborough Environment Centre’s annual general meeting on Tuesday as the organisation looks to continue its 25 year legacy in the region.

Acting convenor Alison Cassanet said the organisation was entirely volunteer-run and survived solely on memberships, donations and the occasional grant.

“Like so many voluntary organisations, we’re trying to manage an increasing workload with only a small committee and would dearly love to have some more committed, environmentally-minded locals willing to become actively involved,” she said.

Ms Cassanet said locals with an enthusiasm for wildlife, coastal care, climate change, renewable energy or other environment fields would benefit from...


Read full article...


Read more: All invited to environment centre's AGM - The West Australian

All invited to environment centre's AGM - The West Australian

4229291 all-invited-to-environment-centre-s-agm-the-west-australian
BDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough TimesBDEC committee member Mike Cartres and project officer Silke Rothkamm assess tree replanting. Picture: Taelor Pelusey Busselton-Dunsborough Times

Environmentally-minded locals are invited to the Busselton-Dunsborough Environment Centre’s annual general meeting on Tuesday as the organisation looks to continue its 25 year legacy in the region.

Acting convenor Alison Cassanet said the organisation was entirely volunteer-run and survived solely on memberships, donations and the occasional grant.

“Like so many voluntary organisations, we’re trying to manage an increasing workload with only a small committee and would dearly love to have some more committed, environmentally-minded locals willing to become actively involved,” she said.

Ms Cassanet said locals with an enthusiasm for wildlife, coastal care, climate change, renewable energy or other environment fields would benefit from...


Read full article...


Read more: All invited to environment centre's AGM - The West Australian

Murray Darling boon from Basin Plan environment water - North Queensland Register

4229295 murray-darling-boon-from-basin-plan-environment-water-north-queensland-register
A juvenile native trout cod.

A juvenile native trout cod.

POLITICS is a fast running current ever present at the surface of Murray Darling Basin Plan reform, but beneath the surface flows a steady undertow of environment and science achievement.

Basin boffins from a range of disciplines have been building our understanding of Australia’s most significant river system, which has received a renewed focus under the Basin Plan.

Recent work has revealed the significance of the Lower Darling, the Great Darling Anabranch and the Menindee Lakes system as a nursery for population growth and a fish highway crucial to connecting the highly mobile native fish species like golden perch.

Research is revealing secrets of fish spawning and helping river managers time flow events to encourage population growth and the National Carp Control Plan is tackling the feral scourge eating natives out of their homes.

Community...


Read full article...


Read more: Murray Darling boon from Basin Plan environment water - North Queensland Register

Mother, son and daughter all arrested in connection to multiple robberies on Long Island

4229329 mother-son-and-daughter-all-arrested-in-connection-to-multiple-robberies-on-long-island

A woman and her two children have been arrested in Long Island in connection to seven armed robberies, all of which took place over the last month.

Deborah Salvatore, 55, and her children, Rick Mascia, 25, and 31-year-old Lauren Mascia, are accused of robbing a number local establishments: Two Family Dollar locations, two Dunkin Donuts, one Dollar Tree and the same Carvel twice.

The most recent robbery was at a Dunkin Donuts on Oct. 21, and it initially didn't go as planned: Rick entered alone and said he wanted to buy a donut, but the cashier replied, "We’re about to close, so you can have the doughnuts for free," recounted another employee to the New York Post.

Rick allegedly responded, "No, I want you to charge me." Then, after the employee opened the cash register, he allegedly brandished a knife and demanded all the money.

His mother was waiting in the car outside.

Police...


Read full article...


Read more: Mother, son and daughter all arrested in connection to multiple robberies on Long Island

Mother, son and daughter all arrested in connection to multiple robberies on Long Island

4229331 mother-son-and-daughter-all-arrested-in-connection-to-multiple-robberies-on-long-island

A woman and her two children have been arrested in Long Island in connection to seven armed robberies, all of which took place over the last month.

Deborah Salvatore, 55, and her children, Rick Mascia, 25, and 31-year-old Lauren Mascia, are accused of robbing a number local establishments: Two Family Dollar locations, two Dunkin Donuts, one Dollar Tree and the same Carvel twice.

The most recent robbery was at a Dunkin Donuts on Oct. 21, and it initially didn't go as planned: Rick entered alone and said he wanted to buy a donut, but the cashier replied, "We’re about to close, so you can have the doughnuts for free," recounted another employee to the New York Post.

Rick allegedly responded, "No, I want you to charge me." Then, after the employee opened the cash register, he allegedly brandished a knife and demanded all the money.

His mother was waiting in the car outside.

Police...


Read full article...


4229333 mother-son-and-daughter-all-arrested-in-connection-to-multiple-robberies-on-long-island

A woman and her two children have been arrested in Long Island in connection to seven armed robberies, all of which took place over the last month.

Deborah Salvatore, 55, and her children, Rick Mascia, 25, and 31-year-old Lauren Mascia, are accused of robbing a number local establishments: Two Family Dollar locations, two Dunkin Donuts, one Dollar Tree and the same Carvel twice.

The most recent robbery was at a Dunkin Donuts on Oct. 21, and it initially didn't go as planned: Rick entered alone and said he wanted to buy a donut, but the cashier replied, "We’re about to close, so you can have the doughnuts for free," recounted another employee to the New York Post.

Rick allegedly responded, "No, I want you to charge me." Then, after the employee opened the cash register, he allegedly brandished a knife and demanded all the money.

His mother was waiting in the car outside.

Police...


Read full article...


4229329 mother-son-and-daughter-all-arrested-in-connection-to-multiple-robberies-on-long-island

A woman and her two children have been arrested in Long Island in connection to seven armed robberies, all of which took place over the last month.

Deborah Salvatore, 55, and her children, Rick Mascia, 25, and 31-year-old Lauren Mascia, are accused of robbing a number local establishments: Two Family Dollar locations, two Dunkin Donuts, one Dollar Tree and the same Carvel twice.

The most recent robbery was at a Dunkin Donuts on Oct. 21, and it initially didn't go as planned: Rick entered alone and said he wanted to buy a donut, but the cashier replied, "We’re about to close, so you can have the doughnuts for free," recounted another employee to the New York Post.

Rick allegedly responded, "No, I want you to charge me." Then, after the employee opened the cash register, he allegedly brandished a knife and demanded all the money.

His mother was waiting in the car outside.

Police...


Read full article...


Read more: Mother, son and daughter all arrested in connection to multiple robberies on Long Island

Mother, son and daughter all arrested in connection to multiple robberies on Long Island

4229333 mother-son-and-daughter-all-arrested-in-connection-to-multiple-robberies-on-long-island

A woman and her two children have been arrested in Long Island in connection to seven armed robberies, all of which took place over the last month.

Deborah Salvatore, 55, and her children, Rick Mascia, 25, and 31-year-old Lauren Mascia, are accused of robbing a number local establishments: Two Family Dollar locations, two Dunkin Donuts, one Dollar Tree and the same Carvel twice.

The most recent robbery was at a Dunkin Donuts on Oct. 21, and it initially didn't go as planned: Rick entered alone and said he wanted to buy a donut, but the cashier replied, "We’re about to close, so you can have the doughnuts for free," recounted another employee to the New York Post.

Rick allegedly responded, "No, I want you to charge me." Then, after the employee opened the cash register, he allegedly brandished a knife and demanded all the money.

His mother was waiting in the car outside.

Police...


Read full article...


Read more: Mother, son and daughter all arrested in connection to multiple robberies on Long Island

Win for environment - Wangaratta Chronicle

4227941 win-for-environment-wangaratta-chronicle

SINGLE-USE plastic bags will be banned across Victoria as part of $30.4 million in the 2017/18 State Budget to improve the ways we manage waste and recover resources.

And Wangaratta residents can have their say on what reusable alternatives to plastic bags they want to see locally such as ‘boomerang bags’.

This is because experiences in other places show that banning lightweight plastics can lead to undesirable results.

This includes increased use of heavier duty plastics, which can have an even greater environmental impact.

Wangaratta council’s OurSay survey is asking people to give their opinions on how lightweight plastic bags can be replaced by a more environmentally friendly alternative.

It supersedes a survey asking if plastic bags should be banned, one that attracted 1500 views but only 17 votes.

To continue reading this story, click here to access our digital edition

Share...


Read full article...


4227943 win-for-environment-wangaratta-chronicle

SINGLE-USE plastic bags will be banned across Victoria as part of $30.4 million in the 2017/18 State Budget to improve the ways we manage waste and recover resources.

And Wangaratta residents can have their say on what reusable alternatives to plastic bags they want to see locally such as ‘boomerang bags’.

This is because experiences in other places show that banning lightweight plastics can lead to undesirable results.

This includes increased use of heavier duty plastics, which can have an even greater environmental impact.

Wangaratta council’s OurSay survey is asking people to give their opinions on how lightweight plastic bags can be replaced by a more environmentally friendly alternative.

It supersedes a survey asking if plastic bags should be banned, one that attracted 1500 views but only 17 votes.

To continue reading this story, click here to access our digital edition

Share...


Read full article...


Read more: Win for environment - Wangaratta Chronicle

Win for environment - Wangaratta Chronicle

4227943 win-for-environment-wangaratta-chronicle

SINGLE-USE plastic bags will be banned across Victoria as part of $30.4 million in the 2017/18 State Budget to improve the ways we manage waste and recover resources.

And Wangaratta residents can have their say on what reusable alternatives to plastic bags they want to see locally such as ‘boomerang bags’.

This is because experiences in other places show that banning lightweight plastics can lead to undesirable results.

This includes increased use of heavier duty plastics, which can have an even greater environmental impact.

Wangaratta council’s OurSay survey is asking people to give their opinions on how lightweight plastic bags can be replaced by a more environmentally friendly alternative.

It supersedes a survey asking if plastic bags should be banned, one that attracted 1500 views but only 17 votes.

To continue reading this story, click here to access our digital edition

Share...


Read full article...


Read more: Win for environment - Wangaratta Chronicle

World Pollutionwatch: evidence grows of lifelong harm from polluted air - The Guardian

4227945 world-pollutionwatch-evidence-grows-of-lifelong-harm-from-polluted-air-the-guardian

Pigeons in Milan have displayed the effects of breathing exhaust from leaded petrol, and new analysis shows they are still suffering ill-effects. Photograph: Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images

There is growing evidence about the lifelong harm from air pollution. The air that we breathe as children can stunt our lung growth, potentially causing problems later in adult life. Air pollution breathed decades ago has been shown to shorten lives in the UK today. However, investigating these lifelong impacts is hampered by a lack of historic measurements.

Can the natural environment help us? Starting with lichens in the Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris in 1886, biomonitoring has helped to track air pollution. In a new twist, researchers in the US have constructed a 135-year history of pollution in America’s rust belt by studying soot in the feathers of museum bird specimens. Tests on 1,347...


Read full article...


4227951 world-pollutionwatch-evidence-grows-of-lifelong-harm-from-polluted-air-the-guardian

Pigeons in Milan have displayed the effects of breathing exhaust from leaded petrol, and new analysis shows they are still suffering ill-effects. Photograph: Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images

There is growing evidence about the lifelong harm from air pollution. The air that we breathe as children can stunt our lung growth, potentially causing problems later in adult life. Air pollution breathed decades ago has been shown to shorten lives in the UK today. However, investigating these lifelong impacts is hampered by a lack of historic measurements.

Can the natural environment help us? Starting with lichens in the Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris in 1886, biomonitoring has helped to track air pollution. In a new twist, researchers in the US have constructed a 135-year history of pollution in America’s rust belt by studying soot in the feathers of museum bird specimens. Tests on 1,347...


Read full article...


Read more: World Pollutionwatch: evidence grows of lifelong harm from polluted air - The Guardian

World Pollutionwatch: evidence grows of lifelong harm from polluted air - The Guardian

4227951 world-pollutionwatch-evidence-grows-of-lifelong-harm-from-polluted-air-the-guardian

Pigeons in Milan have displayed the effects of breathing exhaust from leaded petrol, and new analysis shows they are still suffering ill-effects. Photograph: Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images

There is growing evidence about the lifelong harm from air pollution. The air that we breathe as children can stunt our lung growth, potentially causing problems later in adult life. Air pollution breathed decades ago has been shown to shorten lives in the UK today. However, investigating these lifelong impacts is hampered by a lack of historic measurements.

Can the natural environment help us? Starting with lichens in the Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris in 1886, biomonitoring has helped to track air pollution. In a new twist, researchers in the US have constructed a 135-year history of pollution in America’s rust belt by studying soot in the feathers of museum bird specimens. Tests on 1,347...


Read full article...


Read more: World Pollutionwatch: evidence grows of lifelong harm from polluted air - The Guardian

The eco guide to new mindful activism - The Guardian

4227957 the-eco-guide-to-new-mindful-activism-the-guardian

Craftivist at work: preparing for a Get Crafty for Our Climate event. The placard reads ‘A little less conversation a little more action please’. Photograph: Frantzesco Kangaris/PA

Activists are the vital foot soldiers of the environmental movement. But is the classic activist model – placard-bearing and angry – actually effective? There’s a suggestion that if you’re not shouting in the face of The Man 24 hours a day, do you actually care?

Sarah Corbett warns that angry activists are in danger of burning out

Author Sarah Corbett cares very much, not just about activism, but activists themselves. In her book How to be a Craftivist, she warns that the angry variety can be in danger of burning out. She nearly did, until she realised that as an introvert she needed a different style of protest. Corbett found it in craftivism, a term coined by writer Betsy Greer –who describes it as...


Read full article...


4227959 the-eco-guide-to-new-mindful-activism-the-guardian

Craftivist at work: preparing for a Get Crafty for Our Climate event. The placard reads ‘A little less conversation a little more action please’. Photograph: Frantzesco Kangaris/PA

Activists are the vital foot soldiers of the environmental movement. But is the classic activist model – placard-bearing and angry – actually effective? There’s a suggestion that if you’re not shouting in the face of The Man 24 hours a day, do you actually care?

Sarah Corbett warns that angry activists are in danger of burning out

Author Sarah Corbett cares very much, not just about activism, but activists themselves. In her book How to be a Craftivist, she warns that the angry variety can be in danger of burning out. She nearly did, until she realised that as an introvert she needed a different style of protest. Corbett found it in craftivism, a term coined by writer Betsy Greer –who describes it as...


Read full article...


Read more: The eco guide to new mindful activism - The Guardian

The eco guide to new mindful activism - The Guardian

4227959 the-eco-guide-to-new-mindful-activism-the-guardian

Craftivist at work: preparing for a Get Crafty for Our Climate event. The placard reads ‘A little less conversation a little more action please’. Photograph: Frantzesco Kangaris/PA

Activists are the vital foot soldiers of the environmental movement. But is the classic activist model – placard-bearing and angry – actually effective? There’s a suggestion that if you’re not shouting in the face of The Man 24 hours a day, do you actually care?

Sarah Corbett warns that angry activists are in danger of burning out

Author Sarah Corbett cares very much, not just about activism, but activists themselves. In her book How to be a Craftivist, she warns that the angry variety can be in danger of burning out. She nearly did, until she realised that as an introvert she needed a different style of protest. Corbett found it in craftivism, a term coined by writer Betsy Greer –who describes it as...


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Read more: The eco guide to new mindful activism - The Guardian

 

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Up yourself
full of yourself, stuck-up

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I don't know! I don't know why I did it, I don't know why I enjoyed it, and I don't know why I'll do it again!

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