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The latest Health News. Articles for residents and businesses of Australia from National and International resources.

 

Injecting Smart Glue Could Be A Temporary Fix For Severe Eyeball Injury On The Battlefield - IFLScience

Researchers have developed a new treatment that involves injecting smart glue into the site of a major injury in the eyeball. This then solidifies into a plug to seal the wound.

In theory, this should give the patient more time to get to safety and receive medical treatment in order to permanently close the injury and hopefully save the eye from further damage.

Although less discussed, serious eye injury is a major problem in modern warfare. “If you look at historical data over the last several decades, the rate of war-related ocular injuries has steadily increased from a fraction of a percent to as high as 10 to 15 percent,” explains researcher John Whalen, who co-authored the study published in Science Translational Medicine, in a statement. This is at least in part down to the changes in warfare, particularly when it comes to improvised explosive devices.

Niki Bayat et al.,...

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Read more: Injecting Smart Glue Could Be A Temporary Fix For Severe Eyeball Injury On The Battlefield -...

A father's heartache when his son with autism discovers his entire grade at party without him - Now To Love

When you send your child off to school, all you want for them is to have a happy time. To make friends, feel included and enjoy themselves. So you can imagine this Sydney dad’s heartache when his seven-year-old son discovered all of his classmates at a birthday party that he was the only one not invited to.

Yahoo7 reported that, the father-of-four, originally from New Zealand, shared his story on a Kiwi dad’s Facebook page, saying his son, who has autism, was so embarrassed to see not just his classmates but his entire grade, already gathered at the beach in Cronulla.

The dad, who wishes to remain anonymous, explained that the family had taken a trip to the beach where they spotted his son’s classmates at the birthday party.

"When my boy walked into the park with his Mum to wait for us to arrive, he saw not only every kid in his actual class, but every kid in his whole grade was...


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Read more: A father's heartache when his son with autism discovers his entire grade at party without him -...

Woman regrets getting plastic surgery 30 times for her boyfriend - NEWS.com.au

WELL, that’s a deal-breaker.

Berry Ng, a 22-year-old YouTube star from Hong Kong, has had more than 30 plastic surgery procedures in the past five years — all to impress her now ex-boyfriend.

She says she started going under the knife because her ex criticised her looks and kept comparing her to supermodels, reports Next Shark.

Ng has spent more than $US3,000 ($4000) augmenting her forehead, eyes, cheeks, nose, chin and breasts.

But that still wasn’t enough to impress her critical beau.

“At that moment, if he had stopped me and told me that I was beautiful enough, I would have stopped, but he didn’t,” she said.

Even after all of her operations, he still didn’t like her breasts. So she got them augmented last year.

When Ng’s mother saw her after that last operation, she started crying. In that moment, Ng realised her plastic surgery obsession had gotten out of control.

She’s...


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Read more: Woman regrets getting plastic surgery 30 times for her boyfriend - NEWS.com.au

Study points to Canola-Alzheimer's link - SBS

The long-term consumption of canola oil might be bad for the brain, new research suggests.

A US study involving mice has linked the consumption of the vegetable cooking oil with the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, including worsened memory, worsened learning ability and weight gain.

The Philadephia-based University of Temple researchers started by dividing the mice into two groups at six months of age, before the animals developed signs of Alzheimer's.

One group was fed a normal diet while the others were fed a diet supplemented with the equivalent of about two tablespoons of canola oil a day.

When the mice were assessed 12 months of age, one of the first differences observed was body weight. Animals on the canola oil-enriched diet weighed significantly more than mice on the regular diet.

Maze tests to assess working memory, short-term memory and learning ability uncovered more...


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Read more: Study points to Canola-Alzheimer's link - SBS

Six foods that actually make you hungrier - NEWS.com.au

WITH Christmas just a hop, skip and a jump away, you’re probably preparing to eat yourself silly.

And you know how it goes: half an hour after declaring you are never going to eat again, ever, you find yourself standing at the fridge, looking for a snack.

Food may sate your hunger, but some things do a better job than others. Here are the six biggest offenders in the food and drink that fails to fill you.

ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS

This may pose as the healthy alternative to sugar but, in many ways, you’re still having your cake and eating it too.

Found in an abundance of food and drink labelled “diet” or “sugar-free”, artificial sweeteners are considered safe, however their affect on the body’s ability to gauge how many calories are being consumed is fairly poor.

This results in you being enticed to crave more and eat more — all the while receiving little to no satisfaction.

Plus the...


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Read more: Six foods that actually make you hungrier - NEWS.com.au

Potential cure for haemophilia in groundbreaking gene therapy - Illawarra Mercury

None
Eunice Lee, with her son, Mark Lee, who has successfully completed a gene therapy trial for haemophilia, and her granddaughters, Grace, 10, and Violet ,18 months, and her daughter in law, Shannon Salo, at the Charles Perkins Centre at RPA in Sydney. Eunice lost two other sons to haemophilia. 7th December 2017 Photo: Janie Barrett

Eunice Lee, with her son, Mark Lee, who has successfully completed a gene therapy trial for haemophilia, and her granddaughters, Grace, 10, and Violet ,18 months, and her daughter in law, Shannon Salo, at the Charles Perkins Centre at RPA in Sydney. Eunice lost two other sons to haemophilia. 7th December 2017 Photo: Janie Barrett

A new gene therapy for haemophilia B has the potential to cure the life-threatening bleeding disorder in one dose, groundbreaking research suggests.

Researchers at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney have called their findings a major breakthrough for people with the hereditary disorder caused by defective or missing coagulation factors, which prevents their blood from clotting properly.

Haemophilia patients are dependent on multiple infusions of factor concentrates, as many as three a week, to guard against major bleeding that can be triggered...


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Read more: Potential cure for haemophilia in groundbreaking gene therapy - Illawarra Mercury

Social smoking: Will an occasional cigarette damage your health? - ABC Online

It's holiday season, so many of us are partying a bit more than usual.

This means more food, more booze, more late nights and, for some, it might involve smoking the odd cigarette.

But how bad is it to smoke occasionally?

The idea that low-level smoking doesn't do you any harm is a dangerous myth, Professor David Currow of the Cancer Institute NSW said.

Social smokers often don't think of themselves as smokers, he said, so they don't believe health warnings about smoking apply to them.

But the bottom line is every cigarette exposes your body to harmful chemicals.

"There's no safe level of smoking. What's more, the negative health effects add up across your life," he said.

What sort smoker are you teaser box

What type of smoker are you?

Groups of low-level or occasional smokers include:

The social smoker: Tends to only smoke in social settings, like at the pub or when out with...


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Read more: Social smoking: Will an occasional cigarette damage your health? - ABC Online

Guidelines for child stroke to be standardised - NEWS.com.au

HUNDREDS of Australian children and babies who have strokes each year will now have better access to the latest life-changing treatments and diagnostic tools used on adults.

Most delays to treatment for adult stroke patients occur before they get to hospital. But for the 300 kids who suffer a stroke each year, the hold-ups typically happen once they get to hospital as stroke is not top-of-mind for clinicians or parents.

It usually takes 12 hours to confirm a diagnosis, a delay that means they miss out on time-critical interventions to minimise brain injury and improve recovery, leaving half of young patients with lifelong disabilities.

EXPERIMENTAL DEVICE STIMULATES THE TONGUE TO IMPROVE STROKE SURVIVORS’ BALANCE

STROKE WARNING SIGNS

Just one Victorian child has received clot-busting medication within the crucial six-hours after an ischaemic stroke, despite this being routinely used...


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Read more: Guidelines for child stroke to be standardised - NEWS.com.au

C3 Church Monash and Canberra Raiders help build a garden for brave Freyja Christiansen who is battling rare cancer - Brisbane Times

The garden us a surprise for Freyja when she returns home next, hopefully next week.

Lizzie said she met with members of the church, which is attended by friends of Freyja's at her school, Yarralumla Primary.

They plan to put in grass, trees and plants, making paths, a cubby for Freyja and her sisters, Inge and Brynn, and a home for Freyja's rabbit, Cottontail.

There will also be a "healing garden" of fruit trees, vegetables and herbs, something Lizzie, who cooks all organic food for her daughters, most appreciates.

Canberra girl Freyja Christiansen in hospital in her Wonder Woman gear.

Canberra girl Freyja Christiansen in hospital in her Wonder Woman gear.

Photo: supplied

"They said, 'This is our Christmas gift to Freyja," Lizzie said.

"And, oh my gosh, I was just in tears.

Freyja Christiansen offered a pinky promise to reassure her mum she would be a brave girl for the tests for her cancer.

Freyja Christiansen offered a pinky promise to reassure her mum she would be a brave girl for the tests for her cancer.

Photo: Supplied

"They felt it was something they could do...


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Read more: C3 Church Monash and Canberra Raiders help build a garden for brave Freyja Christiansen who is...

Healthy diet may be linked to less disability, fewer symptoms for people with MS - News-Medical.net

December 7, 2017

For people with multiple sclerosis (MS), eating a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables and whole grains may be linked to having less disability and fewer symptoms than people whose diet is less healthy, according to a study published in the December 6, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

"People with MS often ask if there is anything they can do to delay or avoid disability, and many people want to know if their diet can play a role, but there have been few studies investigating this," said study author Kathryn C. Fitzgerald, ScD, of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md., and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. "While this study does not determine whether a healthy lifestyle reduces MS symptoms or whether having severe symptoms makes it harder for people to engage in a healthy lifestyle, it...


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Read more: Healthy diet may be linked to less disability, fewer symptoms for people with MS - News-Medical.net

Older Generations Could Stave Off Alzheimer's By Playing Video Games - HuffPost UK

By now you’re probably used to hearing that sitting inside playing video games all day is really bad for your health (not to mention, giving you square eyes).

But it seems there could actually be one disease that gaming could stop from getting worse - or even prevent in some cases - Alzheimer’s.

This is as a study has found that for people aged between 55 and 75 years old, playing Super Mario 64 for thirty minutes a day was able to stave off mild cognitive impairment.

In 2014 and 2017 two separate studies were conducted on a group of people in their twenties to see what affect gaming had on their hippocampus grey matter - the key region associated with spacial and episodic memory - and an important marker for neurological disorders.

They found that grey matter increased after training.

So a team from the University of Montreal wanted to see if they could replicate the results...


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Read more: Older Generations Could Stave Off Alzheimer's By Playing Video Games - HuffPost UK

Women are naturally fitter than men, study claims - The Independent

Young women could be aerobically fitter than young men, a new study has claimed.

While previous research has mostly indicated that men supersede women on the fitness front, researchers at the University of Waterloo in Canada have found that women are able to draw oxygen from the blood at a faster rate, meaning that they can actually outperform men.

Thomas Beltrame and a team of scientists measured the oxygen uptake and muscle oxygen extraction rates of 18 young men and women while they exercised on a treadmill.

All of the participants were of a similar age and weight in order to ensure for a fair result.

The participants performed three moderate-intensity treadmill exercises, during which time their oxygen processes were closely monitored.

The scientist concluded that the nine female participants processed oxygen at an average rate of 30 per cent times faster than the men...


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Read more: Women are naturally fitter than men, study claims - The Independent

Breakthrough gene therapy offers cure for blood disorder haemophilia: Sydney scientists - The Sydney Morning Herald

A new gene therapy for haemophilia B has the potential to cure the life-threatening bleeding disorder in one dose, groundbreaking research suggests.

Researchers at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney have called their findings a major breakthrough for people with the hereditary disorder caused by defective or missing coagulation factors, which prevents their blood from clotting properly.

Professor John Rasko gets a hug from Eunice Lee, after her son, Mark, successfully completed a gene therapy trial for ... Professor John Rasko gets a hug from Eunice Lee, after her son, Mark, successfully completed a gene therapy trial for haemophilia at the Charles Perkins Centre at RPA in Sydney.  Photo: Janie Barrett

Haemophilia patients are dependent on multiple infusions of factor concentrates, as many as three a week, to guard against major bleeding that can be triggered by even minor injuries. People with haemophilia B - about 20 per cent of all cases - have a factor IX deficiency.

The team of Australian...


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Read more: Breakthrough gene therapy offers cure for blood disorder haemophilia: Sydney scientists - The...

Breakthrough gene therapy offers cure for blood disorder haemophilia: Sydney scientists - The Sydney Morning Herald

A new gene therapy for haemophilia B has the potential to cure the life-threatening bleeding disorder in one dose, groundbreaking research suggests.

Researchers at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney have called their findings a major breakthrough for people with the hereditary disorder caused by defective or missing coagulation factors, which prevents their blood from clotting properly.

Professor John Rasko gets a hug from Eunice Lee, after her son, Mark, successfully completed a gene therapy trial for ... Professor John Rasko gets a hug from Eunice Lee, after her son, Mark, successfully completed a gene therapy trial for haemophilia at the Charles Perkins Centre at RPA in Sydney.  Photo: Janie Barrett

Haemophilia patients are dependent on multiple infusions of factor concentrates, as many as three a week, to guard against major bleeding that can be triggered by even minor injuries. People with haemophilia B - about 20 per cent of all cases - have a factor IX deficiency.

The team of Australian...


Read full article on News GN Health


Read more: Breakthrough gene therapy offers cure for blood disorder haemophilia: Sydney scientists - The...

The real causes of premature death in mental illness - 6minutes

A Lancet study has revealed a significant gap in life expectancy for people with mental illness.

The research from the Australian National University (ANU) has found that men who are diagnosed with a mental health condition in their lifetime can expect to live 10.2 years less than those who aren’t.

Meanwhile, women with a mental health condition die 7.3 years earlier.

Lead researcher Associate Professor Annette Erlangsen says the study, which analysed medical and hospital data from Denmark from 1994-2014, also found the mortality gap had stayed consistent, despite efforts to address the issue.

“Ten years of life expectancy are lost for those with mental illness,” she says

This is in spite of a concerted effort to address the problem.

While suicide, homicide and accidents were major contributing factors in the gap, the study found those causes of death had declined over the 20-year...


Read full article on News GN Health


Read more: The real causes of premature death in mental illness - 6minutes

The real causes of premature death in mental illness - 6minutes

A Lancet study has revealed a significant gap in life expectancy for people with mental illness.

The research from the Australian National University (ANU) has found that men who are diagnosed with a mental health condition in their lifetime can expect to live 10.2 years less than those who aren’t.

Meanwhile, women with a mental health condition die 7.3 years earlier.

Lead researcher Associate Professor Annette Erlangsen says the study, which analysed medical and hospital data from Denmark from 1994-2014, also found the mortality gap had stayed consistent, despite efforts to address the issue.

“Ten years of life expectancy are lost for those with mental illness,” she says

This is in spite of a concerted effort to address the problem.

While suicide, homicide and accidents were major contributing factors in the gap, the study found those causes of death had declined over the 20-year...


Read full article on News GN Health


Read more: The real causes of premature death in mental illness - 6minutes

Mother desperate for organ transplant after her kidneys shut down following spider bite - Yahoo7 News

A mum-of-three is desperate for an organ transplant this Christmas after treatment for a spider bite triggered kidney failure.

Carly Anderson, from south London, was sunbathing when she was bitten on her inner thigh in August.

The poisonous spider was not the cause of her kidney failure, but the antibiotics she was given to treat the bite made her condition worse.

After years of medical problems, the 36-year-old was bitten by what she believes was a false widow spider.

The subsequent medication used to flush the spider poison from her bloodstream, along with her diabetes, caused her kidneys to shut down, and now she is in dire need of help.

A mum-of-three who was bitten by a spider is desperate...


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Read more: Mother desperate for organ transplant after her kidneys shut down following spider bite - Yahoo7...

Mother desperate for organ transplant after her kidneys shut down following spider bite - Yahoo7 News

A mum-of-three is desperate for an organ transplant this Christmas after treatment for a spider bite triggered kidney failure.

Carly Anderson, from south London, was sunbathing when she was bitten on her inner thigh in August.

The poisonous spider was not the cause of her kidney failure, but the antibiotics she was given to treat the bite made her condition worse.

After years of medical problems, the 36-year-old was bitten by what she believes was a false widow spider.

The subsequent medication used to flush the spider poison from her bloodstream, along with her diabetes, caused her kidneys to shut down, and now she is in dire need of help.

A mum-of-three who was bitten by a spider is desperate...


Read full article on News GN Health


Read more: Mother desperate for organ transplant after her kidneys shut down following spider bite - Yahoo7...

Study: Traffic-related air pollutants appear to thwart benefits of walking among older adults - News-Medical.net

December 7, 2017

Study analyzed health impact of a walk through the traffic-polluted Oxford Street in London, compared to Hyde Park.

Even short-term (2 hour) exposure to tiny particles of soot or dust found in traffic fumes on busy roads appears to thwart the benefits of walking on the heart and lungs among older adults (aged 60 or over), according to a study comparing the health effects of walking along a traffic-polluted road versus walking through a park. The effect was particularly marked in people with existing respiratory illness.

The study, published in The Lancet, suggests that short term exposure to pollution is associated with stiffening of the arteries and impaired lung function, and strengthens the case to reduce vehicle emissions so that everyone can enjoy the health benefits of physical activity.

“Our findings indicate that in traffic congested streets, like London’s...


Read full article on News GN Health


Read more: Study: Traffic-related air pollutants appear to thwart benefits of walking among older adults -...

Study: Traffic-related air pollutants appear to thwart benefits of walking among older adults - News-Medical.net

December 7, 2017

Study analyzed health impact of a walk through the traffic-polluted Oxford Street in London, compared to Hyde Park.

Even short-term (2 hour) exposure to tiny particles of soot or dust found in traffic fumes on busy roads appears to thwart the benefits of walking on the heart and lungs among older adults (aged 60 or over), according to a study comparing the health effects of walking along a traffic-polluted road versus walking through a park. The effect was particularly marked in people with existing respiratory illness.

The study, published in The Lancet, suggests that short term exposure to pollution is associated with stiffening of the arteries and impaired lung function, and strengthens the case to reduce vehicle emissions so that everyone can enjoy the health benefits of physical activity.

“Our findings indicate that in traffic congested streets, like London’s...


Read full article on News GN Health


Read more: Study: Traffic-related air pollutants appear to thwart benefits of walking among older adults -...

 

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