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The latest Health News. Articles for residents and businesses of Australia from National and International resources.

 

Middle-aged male office workers 'more sedentary than over-75-year-olds' - Telegraph.co.uk

Middle-aged male office workers spend more time sitting down than pensioners, with large parts of the population "dangerously sedentary", according to new research.

The Edinburgh University study found 45 to 54-year-old men spend on average 7.8 hours per weekday sitting down, compared to 7.4 hours for men aged over-75.

Sedentary work is the main reason for the inactivity, with sedentary time (ST) defined as time spent in any waking activity done while sitting or reclined, including working, eating, reading, watching TV or spending time on a computer.

Women in all age groups spend less time sitting then the over-75s, who spend an average 7.4 hours seated each day.

Experts are calling for action to tackle high levels of ST, which has been linked to health risks including cardiovascular disease and type two diabetes.

Among men, only the youngest group surveyed - 16 to 24-year-olds - are...


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Read more: Middle-aged male office workers 'more sedentary than over-75-year-olds' - Telegraph.co.uk

Sydney GP stripped of licence for 'inappropriate touching' of girls as young as 12 - Yahoo7 News

Yahoo7 News

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A western Sydney doctor who inappropriately touched girls as young as 12 has been stripped of his medical licence.

The New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal said Dr Elvin Cheng touched five of his female patients for his own pleasure between 1993 and 2013.

The tribunal found the GP's touching equated to "recurrent predatory sexualised behaviour", the Daily Telegraph reports.

"In the absence of any valid clinical purpose for the manner in which he conducted the examinations, the only possible inference in all the circumstances is that the respondent did what he did for sexual gratification," the finding states.

The Western Sydney GP was stripped of his licence. Source: Stock

There were five victims;...


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Read more: Sydney GP stripped of licence for 'inappropriate touching' of girls as young as 12 - Yahoo7 News

Complete DNA sequencing should not be feared according to researchers - News-Medical.net

By June 26, 2017

It is now much easier than before to do a complete DNA sequencing of patients to look at all the three billion letters that make up a person’s genetic code or genome. DNA sequencing prices have fallen and it could soon be a part of routine medical tests experts suggest. However there is public fear associated with complete sequencing. Researchers looked at the fact if this fear was actually justified.

Complete DNA sequencing should not be feared according to researchers - Image Credit: gopixa / Shutterstock

Complete DNA sequencing should not be feared according to researchers - Image Credit: gopixa / Shutterstock

According to this new study published in Annals of Internal Medicine, the amount of information genetated out of complete genome sequencing or whole genome sequencing (WGS), can be overwhelming. Teri Manolio, director of the division of genomic medicine at the National Human Genome Institute, which funded the study who wrote an editorial...


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Read more: Complete DNA sequencing should not be feared according to researchers - News-Medical.net

Bowel screening could save 83000 lives - NEWS.com.au

More than 80,000 lives would be saved by 2040 if participation in the national bowel cancer screening program increased by 20 per cent, modelling estimates.

An Australian study published in The Lancet Public Health journal estimated the benefits and cost-effectiveness of Australia's National Bowel Cancer Screening program between 2015-2040.

At the moment only around 40 per cent of those who are eligible for bowel screening participate in the program. At that level, an estimated 59,000 deaths will be prevented by 2040.

Director of Research at Cancer Council NSW, Professor Karen Canfell says an additional and 24,800 deaths could be averted if participation rose to 60 per cent.

"This means that if just 20 per cent more Australians participated in the program, 83,800 lives could be saved between now and 2040," Prof Canfell said.

The primary aim of bowel screening is to detect cancer at...


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Read more: Bowel screening could save 83000 lives - NEWS.com.au

Call to ban cartoons on kids 'junk food' - NEWS.com.au

More than half of supermarket products marketed at kids are unhealthy, according to a new survey by the Obesity Policy Coalition.

The finding has lead to calls for cartoon characters to be removed from 'junk food' packaging.

The OPC surveyed 186 packaged foods with cartoons or character promotions designed to attract children.

It found 52 per cent were classified as unhealthy by the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criterion calculator.

Foods containing high levels of saturated fat, sugars and sodium typically fall under the unhealthy category.

Nearly 90 per cent of kids' snack bars, or 26 out of 30 products, were deemed unhealthy.

Unhealthy ice-creams, cheese snacks and kids' breakfast cereals were also among the biggest culprits of using the "lure" of cartoons.

OPC Executive Manager Jane Martin says given that 27 per cent of Australian...


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Read more: Call to ban cartoons on kids 'junk food' - NEWS.com.au

Magnetic implants keep "dancing eyes" in place - New Atlas

Rich Haridy Rich Haridy June 26, 2017
The magnetic prosthesis (shown in red) are implanted to reduce uncontrollable eye movements associated with the ...

The magnetic prosthesis (shown in red) are implanted to reduce uncontrollable eye movements associated with the condition nystagmus (Credit: Dr Parashkev Nachev)

Nystagmus is a condition involving an involuntary flickering of the eyes. Resulting in reduced or limited vision, this condition that affects almost one in 400 people, and is euphemistically referred to as "dancing eyes". A new procedure to treat the condition has been developed involving implanting magnets behind a person's eyes to stabilize the uncontrollable eye movements.

The research team, composed of academics from University College London and the University of Oxford, focused on finding a way to control movement of the eye muscles to manage the symptoms from this condition. The exact mechanisms that cause nystagmus are still not known, but the team concentrated on developing a prothesis...


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Read more: Magnetic implants keep "dancing eyes" in place - New Atlas

New limbs for growing bodies: Mutilated albinos get refitted - New Jersey Herald

Baraka Cosmas waits to have a plaster cast made of the remainder of his arm at Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, Monday, March 27, 2017. Cosmas and other children from Tanzania with the hereditary condition of albinism are in the U.S. to receive free surgery and prostheses at the hospital. The children were attacked and dismembered in the belief that their body parts will bring wealth. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
The Associated Press

Baraka Cosmas, 7, is helped by a Customs Border and Patrol agent upon arriving at JFK airport from Tanzania, Saturday, March 25, 2017, in New York. Cosmas was returning to the United States along with three other albinos to be refitted for new prosthetic limbs for their growing bodies. The four, all albinos, lost limbs to attackers who believe body parts from albinos hold magical powers. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
The Associated Press


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Read more: New limbs for growing bodies: Mutilated albinos get refitted - New Jersey Herald

Greater muscle strength linked to better cognitive function in older people - News-Medical.net

June 27, 2017

Greater muscle strength is associated with better cognitive function in aging men and women, according to a new Finnish study. The association of extensively measured upper and lower body muscle strength with cognitive function was observed, but handgrip strength was not associated with cognitive function. Cognition refers to brain functions relating to receiving, storing, processing and using information. The findings were published in European Geriatric Medicine.

The study population comprised 338 men and women with an average age of 66 years. Their muscle strength was measured utilizing handgrip strength, three lower body exercises such as leg extension, leg flexion and leg press and two upper body exercises such as chest press and seated row. Sum scores to depict lower body and upper body muscle strength were calculated separately, and cognitive function was...


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Read more: Greater muscle strength linked to better cognitive function in older people - News-Medical.net

Key Takeaways from CBO Score of the Senate's ACA Replacement Plan

Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website.

A new analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office found that the Senate's plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act would have much the same effect as the plan passed in May by the House — drastically changing how Americans get health insurance, especially older, sicker, and poorer people.

Key findings in the CBO report

  • Millions more will be uninsured. By 2026, 22 million more Americans would be uninsured under the GOP plan than if the ACA remained in place. That's 1 million fewer than under the House bill, which the CBO analyzed last month. In total, 49 million people in the U.S. will be uninsured by 2026, compared with 28 million under the ACA.
  • Medicaid recipients are hit hardest. Fifteen million of the 22 million will be dropping from Medicaid, the government health insurance program for...

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Read more: Key Takeaways from CBO Score of the Senate's ACA Replacement Plan

Woman in the UK left paralysed after having an orgasm - New Zealand Herald

A woman in the United Kingdom has been left confined to a wheelchair after having sex with her husband caused her to have a stroke.

Lucinda Allen nearly died after having an orgasm that resulted in an excruciating headache.

The 38-year-old mum was six months pregnant when she was put into a medically-induced coma after a stroke left her permanently paralysed on her left side.

The West Midlands native said that headaches after sex were not uncommon for her, but on that particular day a sharp pain above her eye made her unable to even sleep.

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She told the Sun: "I was writhing on the bed in agony and crying when Tony phoned my mum.

"I've experienced what's known as post-orgasm 'thunderclap' head-pain all through my adult life.

"The pain I usually have after orgasm is a bit like brain-freeze - quite painful but never lasts long.

"But after a while, I realised it just...


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Read more: Woman in the UK left paralysed after having an orgasm - New Zealand Herald

Mental Health Inquiry deadline extended - Northern Star

THE deadline for public submissions to the Public Accounts Committee on its health care inquiry has been extended.

Ballina MP, Tamara Smith, said she was pleased to hear the deadline had been extended to July 31.

"I was pleased to receive a letter from the chair of the Public Accounts Committee stating that the Management of Health Care Services in NSW Inquiry will extend its deadline from the end of this month until the end of July, to enable more people in the Northern Rivers Region to make submissions," Ms Smith said.

"This is in large part due to the public and media attention around the case of Miriam Merten at Lismore Base Hospital, and the news that her treatment would be considered as part of this Inquiry instead of as a separate Inquiry."

"Members of the public or organisations who are concerned about the funding and resourcing of mental health services in this region can...


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Read more: Mental Health Inquiry deadline extended - Northern Star

Half of food marketed at kids is junk, obesity researchers find - New Zealand Herald

More than half the supermarket products marketed at kids are unhealthy, new obesity research has revealed.

The Obesity Policy Coalition surveyed 186 packaged foods with cartoons or characters designed to attract children. They found 52 per cent were classified as unhealthy by the Food Standards Australia, New Zealand.

Kids' ice creams, ice blocks and snack bars were the worst with almost 90 per cent of each being found to be unhealthy.

Among the unhealthy products were Kellogg's Frosties, which are 41 per cent sugar, and Kraft Cheestik Sticks, which contain 17.5g of saturated fat per 100g.

One in three Kiwi children are obese or overweight.

OPC executive manager Jane Martin was shocked to see so many manufacturers directly targeting children with unhealthy food.

"It's extremely frustrating to see cartoons and animations being used to lure children and
create pester power to push parents...


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Read more: Half of food marketed at kids is junk, obesity researchers find - New Zealand Herald

Bone fractures 'costing Australia billions' - Sky News Australia

A failure to prevent fractures as a result of poor bone health is costing the nation billions of dollars each year, according to a new report.

Analysis released by Osteoporosis Australia estimates the brittle bones of Australians aged 50 and over is expected to cost $3.1 billion in 2017, this will climb to $21.9 billion by 2022.

Osteoporosis Australia Medical Director Professor Peter Ebeling AO says hospitals are becoming 'revolving doors' for fracture patients because of a failure to detect or test for osteoporosis.

'Four-out-of-five Australians treated for an osteoporotic fracture are not tested for osteoporosis, and therefore, are not offered treatment for osteoporosis,' said Professor Ebeling.

There is a significant gap in osteoporosis care, he says, and greater awareness is needed to reduce the burden.

Osteoporosis is a...


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Read more: Bone fractures 'costing Australia billions' - Sky News Australia

Sydney GP stripped of licence for 'inappropriate touching' of girls as young as 12 - Yahoo7 News

Yahoo7 News

!-- property: aunews-mp | module: multipass-article-body-fasttrack | flavour: V2 | health: ok --

A western Sydney doctor who inappropriately touched girls as young as 12 has been stripped of his medical licence.

The New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal said Dr Elvin Cheng touched five of his female patients for his own pleasure between 1993 and 2013.

The tribunal found the GP's touching equated to "recurrent predatory sexualised behaviour", the Daily Telegraph reports.

"In the absence of any valid clinical purpose for the manner in which he conducted the examinations, the only possible inference in all the circumstances is that the respondent did what he did for sexual gratification," the finding states.

The Western Sydney GP was stripped of his licence. Source: Stock

There were five victims;...


Read full article on News GN Health


Read more: Sydney GP stripped of licence for 'inappropriate touching' of girls as young as 12 - Yahoo7 News

Why you should really be scared of ticks this summer - New York Post

Alison Schrag is not normally one to panic, but when she found a tick on her 6-year-old son last month at their vacation home upstate, her mom instincts kicked in.

Ecologists at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in the Hudson Valley say tick populations are slated to be the highest in years due to a wet winter two years ago, which offered ample acorns for the Lyme-disease-carrying mice that ticks feed on.

Meanwhile, the lone star tick, which can cause a severe meat allergy, has spread from its native Southeast habitat, moving up through the East Coast and even touching New England. In the last year, more than 100 cases of the allergy were reported in the Hamptons.

What has outdoor types most nervous, though, is Powassan, a deadly virus transmitted by ticks that can lead to death or permanent disability in 60 percent of cases. The virus can infect the central nervous system and...


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Read more: Why you should really be scared of ticks this summer - New York Post

People with HIV say fear of testing should not stop St. Louisans from finding out - STLtoday.com

The walls of Johnnie Jones’ apartment in Florissant display framed articles about former President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama, as well as photos of Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston.

They also hold a photo of Jones with relatives — and certificates Jones, 51, has received for his fight against HIV and AIDS.

Tuesday is National HIV testing day. And Jones, a gay African-American who learned he was HIV-positive in 1990, is trying to make sure more people get tested for the virus.

Jones’ long battle took a turn in 2000, when he learned his HIV had progressed to AIDS. That was about the time, he said, that the stigma associated with the disease was at its worst.

“I got into a depression when I realized there was no one to talk to and ended up messing my credit,” he said. He filed for bankruptcy in 1991.

His life with HIV and AIDS began with a flu and weight loss that led him to a...


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Read more: People with HIV say fear of testing should not stop St. Louisans from finding out - STLtoday.com

Fighting for disabled people's health - Pursuit

People could be forgiven for thinking that the introduction of the $22 billion a year National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) will solve all the problems around disability; at least when the NDIS’s ‘teething’ problems are ironed out.

But it won’t and it can’t.

When fully-implemented the NDIS will provide individualised funding support to about 460,000 of the four million Australians with disability. Participants can purchase the disability services and support that will assist them in achieving their goals. But while the NDIS might move us beyond the broken disability service system the Productivity Commission identified in 2011, it won’t eliminate disability-related disadvantage. The NDIS is a disability service system response, but transforming the bad deal people with disability live with ultimately depends on changing society.

People with disabilities...

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What we can do to prevent childhood injury - The Sydney Morning Herald

The first notification is a "bat call" from ambulance services letting us know a seriously injured toddler is on the way to hospital. A trauma page, the team assembles - nurses and doctors, surgeon, anaesthetist, social worker and clerk. Sobs and a moan – he's breathing - a rapid handover from the ambulance follows then a transfer to the resuscitation bed and the work starts.

A white-faced parent tells us what happened – a happy moment of play gone wrong, and then repeats the story as their partner arrives. Blood tests are taken, intravenous fluid started, name and details confirmed, X-rays done, a brain scan arranged.

Exploitation at Aveo unacceptable: Minister

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Video duration
01:16


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Read more: What we can do to prevent childhood injury - The Sydney Morning Herald
Tags: morning,herald,sydney,childhood,injury,prevent

Middle-aged male office workers 'more sedentary than over-75-year-olds' - Telegraph.co.uk

Middle-aged male office workers spend more time sitting down than pensioners, with large parts of the population "dangerously sedentary", according to new research.

The Edinburgh University study found 45 to 54-year-old men spend on average 7.8 hours per weekday sitting down, compared to 7.4 hours for men aged over-75.

Sedentary work is the main reason for the inactivity, with sedentary time (ST) defined as time spent in any waking activity done while sitting or reclined, including working, eating, reading, watching TV or spending time on a computer.

Women in all age groups spend less time sitting then the over-75s, who spend an average 7.4 hours seated each day.

Experts are calling for action to tackle high levels of ST, which has been linked to health risks including cardiovascular disease and type two diabetes.

Among men, only the youngest group surveyed - 16 to 24-year-olds - are...


Read full article on News GN Health


Read more: Middle-aged male office workers 'more sedentary than over-75-year-olds' - Telegraph.co.uk
Tags: telegraph,over-75-year-olds,sedentary,male,office,workers,middle-aged

Can Your Meds Make You More Sensitive to Sun and Heat?

Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website.

It might surprise you to know that side effects from common over-the-counter drugs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, and generic), prescriptions such as fluoroquinolone antibiotics, or even the popular supplement St. John's wort, can spoil your summer fun. 

Those and many other common medications can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight, increasing your risk of sunburn or worse—causing photosensitivity, a reaction that can cause red, painful, or itchy rashes, or in severe cases, blisters.

"When we say that a medication causes photosensitivity, we mean that it causes a chemical change in the skin that makes it react abnormally to the sun’s ultraviolet rays," said Jessica Krant, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist and a member of Consumer Reports' medical advisory board.

Rising Temps Raise Risks


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Read more: Can Your Meds Make You More Sensitive to Sun and Heat?
Tags: heat,sun,sensitive,meds

 

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