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Former CIA chief: Trump's Charlottesville comments 'a national disgrace'

Former CIA director John Brennan blasted Donald Trump over statements the president made at Tuesday’s defiant, impromptu news conference in New York at which he spoke at length about the violence that followed a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

Brennan wrote a letter to CNN’s Wolf Blitzer with his impressions of Trump’s performance, the network said, in which he took issue with the president’s “ugly” and “dangerous” rhetoric.

The president had used the Trump Tower podium to restate his belief that blame for the violence that left Heather Heyer dead was shared by “alt-left” counterprotesters as well as the neo-Nazis who flooded the town. White supremacist leaders, like former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke, praised the president for his remarks.

Brennan said he was especially troubled by the message Trump’s remarks had sent to the families of those who had...


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Read more: Former CIA chief: Trump's Charlottesville comments 'a national disgrace'

Former CIA chief: Trump's Charlottesville comments 'a national disgrace'

Former CIA director John Brennan blasted Donald Trump over statements the president made at Tuesday’s defiant, impromptu news conference in New York at which he spoke at length about the violence that followed a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

Brennan wrote a letter to CNN’s Wolf Blitzer with his impressions of Trump’s performance, the network said, in which he took issue with the president’s “ugly” and “dangerous” rhetoric.

The president had used the Trump Tower podium to restate his belief that blame for the violence that left Heather Heyer dead was shared by “alt-left” counterprotesters as well as the neo-Nazis who flooded the town. White supremacist leaders, like former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke, praised the president for his remarks.

Brennan said he was especially troubled by the message Trump’s remarks had sent to the families of those who had...


Read full article on News YH Politics World


Read more: Former CIA chief: Trump's Charlottesville comments 'a national disgrace'

Former CIA chief: Trump's Charlottesville comments 'a national disgrace'

Former CIA director John Brennan blasted Donald Trump over statements the president made at Tuesday’s defiant, impromptu news conference in New York at which he spoke at length about the violence that followed a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

Brennan wrote a letter to CNN’s Wolf Blitzer with his impressions of Trump’s performance, the network said, in which he took issue with the president’s “ugly” and “dangerous” rhetoric.

The president had used the Trump Tower podium to restate his belief that blame for the violence that left Heather Heyer dead was shared by “alt-left” counterprotesters as well as the neo-Nazis who flooded the town. White supremacist leaders, like former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke, praised the president for his remarks.

Brennan said he was especially troubled by the message Trump’s remarks had sent to the families of those who had...


Read full article on News YH Politics World


Read more: Former CIA chief: Trump's Charlottesville comments 'a national disgrace'

'Identity politics' isn't the problem. It could be the solution. - Washington Examiner

Blaming "identity politics" for the bloodshed and chaos in Charlottesville misses the point. It's like blaming "greed" for the recession or blaming gravity for a plane crash.

Yes, the white supremacists and Nazis of Charlottesville and the authoritarian leftist radicals across college campuses are peddling vile identity politics, but we shouldn't therefore presume that only these villains play identity politics. Most politics is identity politics.

More importantly, people need identities — we all need to belong to groups, and groups more specific than "human being." When group identities fade or are stripped away, we don't get groupless culture or identity-free politics. We often get worse identity politics.

If you think there's such thing as non-identity politics, it's probably because your politics are of a piece with the dominant identity. Just as a fish may not know he's in...


Read full article on News GN Politics World


Read more: 'Identity politics' isn't the problem. It could be the solution. - Washington Examiner

Laura Ingraham: Politics to blame for 'newfound outrage' over Confederate statues - Fox News

Conservative commentator Laura Ingraham said Tuesday that politics are clearly at the root of the string of protests surrounding the removal of Confederate statues.

On Saturday, one person was killed and more than a dozen others injured after a rally protesting the removal of a Confederate statue in Charlottesville, Virginia. Clashes between protesters and counter-protesters sparked a national outcry. Both sides of the political spectrum chimed in.

But it was politics, Ingraham said on “Hannity”, which caused the “newfound outrage” behind the removal of the statues.

“I understand that there’s this newfound outrage and level of offense that’s reached this fever pitch about these statues,” Ingraham said. “I think a lot of people have driven by these statues probably for decades and never thought twice about them. But now they’ve become a political symbol. And, if it’s a symbol that...


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Read more: Laura Ingraham: Politics to blame for 'newfound outrage' over Confederate statues - Fox News

After Charlottesville, both Bush presidents denounce ‘hatred in all forms’

Former President George W. Bush and former President George H.W. Bush; Charlottesville, Va. (Yahoo News photo illustration; photos: Bob Levey/Getty Images, Justin Ide/Reuters)

Former President George H.W. Bush and former President George W. Bush, in a rare joint statement, declared Wednesday that Americans must reject “hatred in all its forms” in the aftermath of the white supremacist and neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Va.

“America must always reject racial bigotry, anti-Semitism, and hatred in all forms,” the father-son duo said in the statement, which was released by both their offices.

“As we pray for Charlottesville, we are reminded of the fundamental truths recorded by that city’s most prominent citizen in the Declaration of Independence: we are all created equal and endowed by our Creator with unalienable rights,” they said, in a reference to Thomas Jefferson. “We...


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Read more: After Charlottesville, both Bush presidents denounce ‘hatred in all forms’

Kasich rips Trump's Charlottesville response: 'It's not about winning an argument'

Ohio Gov. John Kasich ripped into President Trump’s response to the violent white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., last weekend that left one counterprotester dead.

In a Wednesday appearance on NBC’s “Today,” a fired-up Kasich, one of Trump’s opponents in last year’s Republican primaries, urged the president to “listen to the people before he takes this presidency in a place that is not acceptable for our country.”

He further slammed Trump for drawing a “moral equivalency” between racist rally attendees and the counterprotesters. Trump has repeatedly blamed both sides for the violence.

Trump gave a much-maligned statement Saturday blaming “many sides” for the violence. Under fire from Republicans and Democrats, he delivered a follow-up Monday specifically condemning the KKK, neo-Nazis, and white supremacists. But on Tuesday, Trump defended and repeated his original...


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Read more: Kasich rips Trump's Charlottesville response: 'It's not about winning an...

As Trump hedges, U.S. military officers condemn Charlottesville rally with clarity

Senior officers in the U.S. Armed Forces are strongly condemning the resurgent white nationalism that has shocked the country the past few days — in what many read as an implicit rebuke of their commander in chief.

President Trump has vacillated between blaming “both sides” and specifically condemning the white nationalists who organized a violent rally last weekend in Charlottesville, Va., that left one counterprotester dead. On Tuesday, Trump insisted there were some “very good people” at the Charlottesville “Unite the Right” rally, which opposed the removal of a Confederate statue from the city.

Related slideshow: Violent clashes erupt at ‘Unite the Right’ rally in Charlottesville, Va. >>>

“Not all of those people were neo-Nazis, believe me. Not all of those people were white supremacists by any stretch,” he said at Trump Tower.

Mere hours after Trump spoke, the Marine Corps...


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Read more: As Trump hedges, U.S. military officers condemn Charlottesville rally with clarity

At service for Charlottesville victim Heather Heyer, a call for 'righteous action'

The mother of Heather Heyer, who was killed while protesting against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., called Wednesday for channeling anger into “righteous action.”

“The truth is we’re all going to have our differences, we’re all going to be angry with each other,” Susan Bro told more than 1,000 people at a memorial service at Charlottesville’s Paramount Theater. “Let’s channel that anger not into hate, not into violence, not into fear, but let’s channel that anger into righteous action.”

Bro joined Heyer’s father, grandfather and co-workers in remembering the 32-year-old paralegal as a compassionate yet stubborn opponent of injustice.

“She wanted fairness, she wanted justice, she wanted everybody to get equal respect,” said Heyer’s grandfather, Elwood Shrader.

View photos

Flowers mark the spot where Heather Heyer was killed. (Photo: Joshua Roberts/Reuters)


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Read more: At service for Charlottesville victim Heather Heyer, a call for 'righteous action'

Trump disbands White House business councils as CEOs flee

As CEOs of major corporations began fleeing President Trump’s two business advisory councils yesterday to protest his remarks on the neo-Nazi violence in Virginia, Trump disbanded both groups.

“Rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople of the Manufacturing Council & Strategy & Policy Forum, I am ending both. Thank you all!” Trump tweeted.

A few minutes earlier, the 16 remaining members of the Strategic and Policy Forum had unanimously voted to disband in an emergency conference call convened by its chairman, Stephen Schwarzman, chairman and CEO of the investment firm Blackstone Group and one of Trump’s biggest Wall Street supporters. The call was demanded by members of the group who were deeply upset about Trump’s comments at a Tuesday press conference about Charlottesville. Of the 19 business leaders who were originally named to the group, three had already quit because of...


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Read more: Trump disbands White House business councils as CEOs flee

Essential Politics: 23 minutes with President Trump - Los Angeles Times

Politicians facing news coverage that they’d rather avoid generally don’t convene free-wheeling press conferences. But as we’ve seen most every week of his time in office, President Trump is not a normal politician or public figure.

Look no further than the 23 minutes he spent with reporters on Tuesday.

Good morning from the state capital. I’m Sacramento Bureau Chief John Myers, and things have been quiet here on the final week of a month-long legislative recess.

But not so in the lobby of the Manhattan skyscraper that bears the president’s name.

‘TWO SIDES,’ TRUMP INSISTS

Trump’s news conference — ostensibly convened to talk about his infrastructure plans — was dominated by his decision to again insist that it wasn’t just white nationalists responsible for the melee in Charlottesville.

And then, he insisted that some attendees wanted nothing more than to protect the statue of Confederate...


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Read more: Essential Politics: 23 minutes with President Trump - Los Angeles Times

White identity politics isn't just about white supremacy. It's much bigger. - Washington Post


White nationalist demonstrators walk into the entrance of Lee Park surrounded by counterdemonstrators in Charlottesville on Aug. 12. (Steve Helber/AP)

In the wake of the violence in Charlottesville on Saturday, President Trump was widely criticized for waiting two days to condemn white nationalist and white supremacist groups by name. Then on Tuesday he created further controversy when he again blamed “both sides” — the white nationalists and the counterprotesters — rather than unequivocally condemn the extremist groups. To many political observers, it appears that Trump prefers to stoke the fires of white identity politics.

Trump’s reaction may have energized some of his key supporters, but the whites marching on Charlottesville were only a small segment of a much larger population for whom the politics of white identity resonates. The vast majority of white Americans who feel...


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Read more: White identity politics isn't just about white supremacy. It's much bigger. - Washington Post

Dem group urges candidates to campaign against money in politics - Fort Worth Star Telegram

A political group trying to drive big money out of politics is endorsing three House Democratic candidates — and declaring it an electoral necessity that the party adopt an aggressive message of campaign finance reform.

In a first for the group this year, End Citizens United on Wednesday threw support to House Democratic challengers, breaking from past practice of backing incumbents and Senate candidates.

Each of them — Chrissy Houlahan in a moderate...


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Read more: Dem group urges candidates to campaign against money in politics - Fort Worth Star Telegram

Another Pence could be getting into politics - The Week Magazine

Citizens of U.S. allies — including Japan, South Korea, Germany, Greece, Turkey, Hungary, France, Spain, Italy, and Sweden — trust Russian President Vladimir Putin more than President Trump, a Pew Research Center survey released Wednesday revealed. Although citizens of these countries are leery of Putin, they have greater trust in him than in Trump to "do the right thing regarding world affairs," Pew found.

Of 36 countries surveyed, 22 reported trusting Putin more. In Greece and Lebanon, for instance, citizens trust Putin more than Trump by a margin of 31 percentage points. Putin is more trusted by a margin of 21 points in Vietnam; 14 points in Germany, Tunisia, and Mexico; and 10 points in South Korea.

In numerous countries, Trump does beat out Putin in trustworthiness — which is comforting considering a global average of just 26 percent of people say they have confidence in the...


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Read more: Another Pence could be getting into politics - The Week Magazine

Susan Sarandon prioritizes politics over acting - Page Six

Susan Sarandon doesn’t care if her political stances cost her work.

“I feel like that’s kind of like worrying if your slip is showing when you’re fleeing a burning building,” the Oscar winner and activist told Jimmy Fallon on “The Tonight Show” on Tuesday, explaining that her job isn’t always her priority.

“I’m gonna be a woman much longer than I’m going to be an actor,” she said. “I’m gonna be a mother much longer than I’ll be an actor.”

Sarandon, 70, also joked about being “very lucky” when she’d been arrested for protesting in the past.

“Sometimes when I’m chained to a pole, they take pictures,” she said. “They say, ‘Do you mind if we take a picture?’ I’m like, ‘Sure, why not? I’m here!'”

She also snuck in a dig at not just the president, but also at Donald Trump’s “The Apprentice” successor, Arnold Schwarzenegger.

“I was reading that the most endangered demographic … whose...


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Read more: Susan Sarandon prioritizes politics over acting - Page Six

Trump appears to accidentally share Twitter dis

President Trump appeared  to accidentally promote a user who called him a “fascist” Tuesday and left the insult visible on his page for several minutes before it was removed.

The user who called Trump a fascist was responding to a story that Trump was considering a pardon for former Sheriff Joe Arpaio. The user, Mike Holden, has frequently shared anti-Trump sentiment, and he joked Tuesday that the president “agrees with him.”

Donald agrees with me, he RTd it.

— Mike Holden (@MikeHolden42) August 15, 2017

In another Tuesday-morning retweet, Trump shared a cartoon of a person with a CNN icon as a head attempting to hold back a train and captioned, “Fake news can’t stop the Trump Train.”

The image was widely criticized as insensitive in the aftermath of last weekend’s white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., where a car plowed into a group of counterprotesters, killing...


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Read more: Trump appears to accidentally share Twitter dis

Roy Moore, Luther Strange advance to runoff in Alabama Senate election

Republican Sen. Luther Strange rode an endorsement from President Trump and a well-funded war chest to secure a spot in next month’s runoff election Tuesday, clearing the first hurdle in his bid to more permanently fill the seat vacated by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

But he will face in the runoff the former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, who won Tuesday’s primary election with 39 percent of the vote (as of 10:30 p.m. ET). Moore fell short of the majority of votes needed to secure the nomination outright, and Strange beat out Rep. Mo Brooks by a little over 12 points.

On the Democratic side, former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones won his party’s nomination outright, although the chances of him defeating a Republican in the general election in the deeply red state seems unlikely.

Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell have placed big bets on Strange, who was...


Read full article on News YH Politics World


Read more: Roy Moore, Luther Strange advance to runoff in Alabama Senate election

Roy Moore, Luther Strange advance to runoff in Alabama Senate election

Republican Sen. Luther Strange rode an endorsement from President Trump and a well-funded war chest to secure a spot in next month’s runoff election Tuesday, clearing the first hurdle in his bid to more permanently fill the seat vacated by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

But he will face in the runoff the former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, who won Tuesday’s primary election with 39 percent of the vote (as of 10:30 p.m. ET). Moore fell short of the majority of votes needed to secure the nomination outright, and Strange beat out Rep. Mo Brooks by a little over 12 points.

On the Democratic side, former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones won his party’s nomination outright, although the chances of him defeating a Republican in the general election in the deeply red state seems unlikely.

Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell have placed big bets on Strange, who was...


Read full article on News YH Politics World


Read more: Roy Moore, Luther Strange advance to runoff in Alabama Senate election

'Identity politics' isn't the problem. It could be the solution. - Washington Examiner

Blaming "identity politics" for the bloodshed and chaos in Charlottesville misses the point. It's like blaming "greed" for the recession or blaming gravity for a plane crash.

Yes, the white supremacists and Nazis of Charlottesville and the authoritarian leftist radicals across college campuses are peddling vile identity politics, but we shouldn't therefore presume that only these villains play identity politics. Most politics is identity politics.

More importantly, people need identities — we all need to belong to groups, and groups more specific than "human being." When group identities fade or are stripped away, we don't get groupless culture or identity-free politics. We often get worse identity politics.

If you think there's such thing as non-identity politics, it's probably because your politics are of a piece with the dominant identity. Just as a fish may not know he's in...


Read full article on News GN Politics World


Read more: 'Identity politics' isn't the problem. It could be the solution. - Washington Examiner

'Identity politics' isn't the problem. It could be the solution. - Washington Examiner

Blaming "identity politics" for the bloodshed and chaos in Charlottesville misses the point. It's like blaming "greed" for the recession or blaming gravity for a plane crash.

Yes, the white supremacists and Nazis of Charlottesville and the authoritarian leftist radicals across college campuses are peddling vile identity politics, but we shouldn't therefore presume that only these villains play identity politics. Most politics is identity politics.

More importantly, people need identities — we all need to belong to groups, and groups more specific than "human being." When group identities fade or are stripped away, we don't get groupless culture or identity-free politics. We often get worse identity politics.

If you think there's such thing as non-identity politics, it's probably because your politics are of a piece with the dominant identity. Just as a fish may not know he's in...


Read full article on News GN Politics World


Read more: 'Identity politics' isn't the problem. It could be the solution. - Washington Examiner

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